Sports Injury Doctors Osseo MN

Local resource for sports injury doctors in Osseo. Includes detailed information on local clinics that provide access to sports medicine, as well as advice and content on injuries specific to sports, and how you as an athlete can avoid the risk.

NovaCare Rehabilitation - Crystal
(763) 244-8288
5700 Bottineau Blvd.
Crystal , MN
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 6:30 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Sunday Closed
Services
Certified Hand Therapist, Occupational Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Women's Health, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Rehabilitation - Rogers
(763) 244-8560
21395 John Milless Dr
Rogers, MN
Hours
Monday 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 9:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 9:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 7:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Aquatic Therapy, Neuro Rehabilitation, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Women's Health, Women's Health Certified Specialist, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Rehabilitation - Fridley
(763) 634-7810
8290 University Ave
Fridley, MN
Hours
Monday 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Tuesday 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Wednesday 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Thursday 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Friday 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Occupational Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Rehabilitation - Ridgedale
(952) 649-3086
2000 Plymouth Rd
Minnetonka, MN
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 7:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Saturday 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Sunday Closed
Services
Aquatic Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Women's Health, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

Minnesota Medical & Rehabilitative Services
(612) 355-7138
4330 So. Cedar Lake Road
Minneapolis, MN
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Aquatic Therapy, Cardiopulmonary, Geriatrics, Lymphedema Program, Manual Therapy, Neuro Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Pediatrics, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Women's Health, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Rehabilitation - Coon Rapids
(763) 634-7348
2104 Northdale Blvd
Coon Rapids, MN
Hours
Monday 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Aquatic Therapy, Certified Hand Therapist, McKenzie Certified Clinic, Occupational Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Rehabilitation - Fridley
(763) 244-8585
480 Osborne Rd
Fridley, MN
Hours
Monday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 7:30 AM - 3:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Certified Hand Therapist, Geriatrics, Graston Certified Clinic, Occupational Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Rehabilitation - Blaine
(763) 244-8526
11855 Ulysses St
Blaine, MN
Hours
Monday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 7:30 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 7:30 AM - 3:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Certified Hand Therapist, Geriatrics, Manual Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Rehabilitation - St. Louis Park
(952) 373-6030
Parkdale Center
St Louis Park, MN
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Rehabilitation - Elk River
(763) 244-8341
555 Railroad Dr
Elk River, MN
Hours
Monday 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Thursday 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 7:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Aquatic Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Women's Health, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

Golfer's Elbow

What structures make up the elbow joint?

The elbow is made up of three bones, which are connected by muscles, ligaments and tendons. The humerus is the large upper arm bone. The ulna and radius are the two bones in the forearm. Looking at the forearm with the palm of the fingers facing up, the ulna is located on the inner (medial) aspect of the forearm. The radius is located on the outer (lateral) aspect of the forearm. Projecting from the end of the humerus are the medial and lateral epicondyles. The epicondyles are the boney attachment sites for many of the forearm muscles.

The muscles that move the fingers and the wrist originate at the elbow. These muscles attach via tendons to the medial and lateral epicondyles. Again, looking at the forearm with the palm of the fingers facing up, the forearm muscles that start on the medial epicondyle help to flex (move upwards, towards the face) the wrist and fingers. The forearm muscles that start on the lateral epicondyle help to extend (move downwards, away from the face) the wrist and fingers.

What is "Golfers elbow"?

"Golfers elbow" (a.k.a. medial epicondylitis) is the term used to describe irritation (inflammation) of the tendons that connect the muscles that flex the wrist and fingers to the medial epicondyle of the elbow. A common site for golfers elbow to occur is right at the attachment site of the tendons to the medial epicondyle. Although this site is the most common, inflammation can occur anywhere along the tendons.

What does golfers elbow feel like?

Golfers elbow usually begins with a gradual onset of dull, intermittent in the inner part of the elbow. It may progress and develop into a sharp continuous pain. Repetitive use of the elbow or arm can increase the pain. Tenderness is often present over the medial epicondyle of the elbow.

What causes golfers elbow?

Golfers elbow usually develops as a result of overuse. Repetitive use of the elbow and arm can cause undue stress on the tendons that flex the wrist and fingers. This in turn leads to the development of microscopic tears in the tendons that flex the wrist and fingers resulting in inflammation and pain. Training errors, weakness of the forearm muscles, poor equipment or inadequate off-season training are some of the other factors that can cause golfers elbow. Finally, golfers elbow can develop as a result of direct trauma or after an elbow injury such as a fracture.

Can golfers elbow be detected on X-rays?

Inflammation of the tendons that flex the wrist and fingers cannot be seen on x-ray. Therefore, although x-rays are often done to rule out bony injuries in individuals with golfers elbow these x-...

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Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)

What structures make up the elbow joint?

The elbow is made up of three bones, which are connected by muscles, ligaments and tendons. The humerus is the large upper arm bone. The ulna and radius are the two bones in the forearm. Looking at the forearm with the palm of the fingers facing up, the ulna is located on the inner (medial) aspect of the forearm. The radius is located on the outer (lateral) aspect of the forearm. Projecting from the end of the humerus are the medial and lateral epicondyles. The epicondyles are the boney attachment sites for many of the forearm muscles.

The muscles that move the fingers and the wrist start at the elbow. These muscles attach via tendons to the medial and lateral epicondyles. Again, looking at the forearm with the palm of the fingers facing up, the forearm muscles that start on the medial epicondyle help to flex (move upwards, towards the face) the wrist and fingers. The forearm muscles that start on the lateral epicondyle help to extend (move downwards, away from the face) the wrist and fingers.

What is "Tennis Elbow"?

"Tennis Elbow" (a.k.a. lateral epicondylitis) is the term used to describe irritation (inflammation) of the tendons that connect the muscles that extend the wrist and fingers to the lateral epicondyle of the elbow. A common site for tennis elbow to occur is right at the attachment site of the tendons to the lateral epicondyle. Although this site is the most common, inflammation can occur anywhere along the tendons.

What does tennis elbow feel like?

Tennis elbow usually begins with a gradual onset of dull, intermittent in the outer part of the elbow. It may progress and develop into a sharp continuous pain. Repetitive use of the elbow or arm can increase the pain. Tenderness is often present over the lateral epicondyle of the elbow.

What causes tennis elbow?

Tennis elbow usually develops as a result of overuse. Repetitive use of the elbow and arm can cause undue stress on the tendons that extend the wrist and fingers. This in turn leads to the development of microscopic tears in the tendons that extend the wrist and fingers resulting in inflammation and pain. Training errors, weakness of the forearm muscles, poor equipment or inadequate off-season training are some of the other factors that can cause tennis elbow. Finally, tennis elbow can develop as a result of direct trauma or after an elbow injury such as a fracture.

Can tennis elbow be detected on X-rays?

Inflammation of the tendons that extend the wrist and fingers cannot be seen on x-ray. Therefore, although x-rays are often done to rule out bony injuries in individuals with tennis elbow these x-rays a...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Joint Pain Info