Sports Injury Doctors North Platte NE

Local resource for sports injury doctors in North Platte. Includes detailed information on local clinics that provide access to sports medicine, as well as advice and content on injuries specific to sports, and how you as an athlete can avoid the risk.

Caroline Erica Sorenson
(308) 534-9100
210 Mcneel Ln
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Data Provided By:
Benjamin Bissell, MD
(308) 534-6655
215 McNeel Lane
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine

Center for Health
(308) 534-6687
302 South Jeffers Street
North Platte, NE
Services
Yeast Syndrome, Women's Health, Wellness Training, Weight Management, Rheumatology, Polarity Therapy, Pharmacology, Pain Management, Nutrition, Metabolic Medicine, Men's Health, Massage Therapy, Internal Medicine, Homeopathy, Herbal Medicine, Healing Touch, General Practice, Gastroenterology, Functional Medicine, Fitness/Exercise, Feng Shui, Family Practice, Endocrinology, EFT, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease, Bio-identical HRT, Arthritis, Allergy, Acupuncture
Membership Organizations
American Holistic Medical Association

Data Provided By:
Jeffrey Christopher Brittan
(308) 534-2532
611 W Francis St
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided By:
David Graham Lindley
(308) 696-2273
811 William Ave
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided By:
Mid-Nebraska Physical Therapy and Sports Center
(308) 534-0999
P.O. Box 747
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Physical Therapist, Doctor of Physical TherapySports Medicine

Dan Cao Nguyen, MD
(308) 532-2130
319 E B St
North Platte, NE
Specialties
General Practice
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med & Pharm Univ, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam (942-01 Eff 1/83)
Graduation Year: 1973

Data Provided By:
Jason Michael Citta
(308) 534-2532
611 W Francis St
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided By:
Dan Nguyen
(308) 532-2130
319 E B St
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided By:
Loretta L Baca
(308) 534-6687
302 S Jeffers St
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
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Golfer's Elbow

What structures make up the elbow joint?

The elbow is made up of three bones, which are connected by muscles, ligaments and tendons. The humerus is the large upper arm bone. The ulna and radius are the two bones in the forearm. Looking at the forearm with the palm of the fingers facing up, the ulna is located on the inner (medial) aspect of the forearm. The radius is located on the outer (lateral) aspect of the forearm. Projecting from the end of the humerus are the medial and lateral epicondyles. The epicondyles are the boney attachment sites for many of the forearm muscles.

The muscles that move the fingers and the wrist originate at the elbow. These muscles attach via tendons to the medial and lateral epicondyles. Again, looking at the forearm with the palm of the fingers facing up, the forearm muscles that start on the medial epicondyle help to flex (move upwards, towards the face) the wrist and fingers. The forearm muscles that start on the lateral epicondyle help to extend (move downwards, away from the face) the wrist and fingers.

What is "Golfers elbow"?

"Golfers elbow" (a.k.a. medial epicondylitis) is the term used to describe irritation (inflammation) of the tendons that connect the muscles that flex the wrist and fingers to the medial epicondyle of the elbow. A common site for golfers elbow to occur is right at the attachment site of the tendons to the medial epicondyle. Although this site is the most common, inflammation can occur anywhere along the tendons.

What does golfers elbow feel like?

Golfers elbow usually begins with a gradual onset of dull, intermittent in the inner part of the elbow. It may progress and develop into a sharp continuous pain. Repetitive use of the elbow or arm can increase the pain. Tenderness is often present over the medial epicondyle of the elbow.

What causes golfers elbow?

Golfers elbow usually develops as a result of overuse. Repetitive use of the elbow and arm can cause undue stress on the tendons that flex the wrist and fingers. This in turn leads to the development of microscopic tears in the tendons that flex the wrist and fingers resulting in inflammation and pain. Training errors, weakness of the forearm muscles, poor equipment or inadequate off-season training are some of the other factors that can cause golfers elbow. Finally, golfers elbow can develop as a result of direct trauma or after an elbow injury such as a fracture.

Can golfers elbow be detected on X-rays?

Inflammation of the tendons that flex the wrist and fingers cannot be seen on x-ray. Therefore, although x-rays are often done to rule out bony injuries in individuals with golfers elbow these x-...

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Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)

What structures make up the elbow joint?

The elbow is made up of three bones, which are connected by muscles, ligaments and tendons. The humerus is the large upper arm bone. The ulna and radius are the two bones in the forearm. Looking at the forearm with the palm of the fingers facing up, the ulna is located on the inner (medial) aspect of the forearm. The radius is located on the outer (lateral) aspect of the forearm. Projecting from the end of the humerus are the medial and lateral epicondyles. The epicondyles are the boney attachment sites for many of the forearm muscles.

The muscles that move the fingers and the wrist start at the elbow. These muscles attach via tendons to the medial and lateral epicondyles. Again, looking at the forearm with the palm of the fingers facing up, the forearm muscles that start on the medial epicondyle help to flex (move upwards, towards the face) the wrist and fingers. The forearm muscles that start on the lateral epicondyle help to extend (move downwards, away from the face) the wrist and fingers.

What is "Tennis Elbow"?

"Tennis Elbow" (a.k.a. lateral epicondylitis) is the term used to describe irritation (inflammation) of the tendons that connect the muscles that extend the wrist and fingers to the lateral epicondyle of the elbow. A common site for tennis elbow to occur is right at the attachment site of the tendons to the lateral epicondyle. Although this site is the most common, inflammation can occur anywhere along the tendons.

What does tennis elbow feel like?

Tennis elbow usually begins with a gradual onset of dull, intermittent in the outer part of the elbow. It may progress and develop into a sharp continuous pain. Repetitive use of the elbow or arm can increase the pain. Tenderness is often present over the lateral epicondyle of the elbow.

What causes tennis elbow?

Tennis elbow usually develops as a result of overuse. Repetitive use of the elbow and arm can cause undue stress on the tendons that extend the wrist and fingers. This in turn leads to the development of microscopic tears in the tendons that extend the wrist and fingers resulting in inflammation and pain. Training errors, weakness of the forearm muscles, poor equipment or inadequate off-season training are some of the other factors that can cause tennis elbow. Finally, tennis elbow can develop as a result of direct trauma or after an elbow injury such as a fracture.

Can tennis elbow be detected on X-rays?

Inflammation of the tendons that extend the wrist and fingers cannot be seen on x-ray. Therefore, although x-rays are often done to rule out bony injuries in individuals with tennis elbow these x-rays a...

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