Sports Injury Doctors Claymont DE

Local resource for sports injury doctors in Claymont. Includes detailed information on local clinics that provide access to sports medicine, as well as advice and content on injuries specific to sports, and how you as an athlete can avoid the risk.

NovaCare Rehabilitation
(302) 746-2200
3623 Silverside Rd.
Wilmington, DE
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Thursday 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Friday 7:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Graston Certified Clinic, Manual Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Rehabilitation - Rocky Run
(215) 259-8925
1299 W Baltimore Pke
Media, PA
Hours
Monday Closed
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Wednesday Closed
Thursday 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Aquatic Therapy, Graston Certified Clinic, Orthopedic Care, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program

Barley Mill Rehabilitation
(302) 319-9677
3604 Lancaster Pike
Wilmington, DE
Promotion
Call our office today to schedule an appointment!
Hours
Monday 7:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Tuesday 7:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Thursday 7:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Friday 7:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Orthopedic Care, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine

NovaCare of Pennsville
(856) 376-0696
269 North Broadway
Pennsville, NJ
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Certified Hand Therapist, Graston Certified Clinic, Manual Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Rehabilitation
(484) 423-4164
3740 West Chester Pike
Newtown Square, PA
Hours
Monday 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday 7:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare of Swedesboro
(856) 294-6800
520 Beckett Road
Swedesboro, NJ
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Thursday 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Graston Certified Clinic, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program

NovaCare Rehabilitation
(484) 466-6820
623 S. Chester Rd.
Swarthmore, PA
Hours
Monday 7:30 AM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday 1:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Thursday 1:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Friday 7:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Aquatic Therapy, Graston Certified Clinic, Manual Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Southwest
(215) 488-5968
2906 Island Ave
Philadelphia, PA
Hours
Monday 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Wednesday 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Thursday 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Friday 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
McKenzie Certified Clinic, Physical Therapists, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Rehabilitation
(484) 401-9409
1502 West Chester Pike
West Chester, PA
Hours
Monday 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday 1:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Friday 7:00 AM - 1:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Manual Therapy, Orthopedic Care, Physical Therapists, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

NovaCare Rehabilitation
(484) 424-9019
580 Reed Road
Broomall, PA
Hours
Monday 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Wednesday 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Thursday 7:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Friday 7:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Saturday Closed
Sunday Closed
Services
Certified Hand Therapist, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Graston Certified Clinic, Manual Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Orthopaedics Certified Specialist, Orthopedic Care, Orthotics & Prosthetic Therapy, Physical Therapists, Sports Certified Specialist, Sports Medicine, TMJ Dysfunction Program, Workers Comp/Rehabilitation

Golfer's Elbow

What structures make up the elbow joint?

The elbow is made up of three bones, which are connected by muscles, ligaments and tendons. The humerus is the large upper arm bone. The ulna and radius are the two bones in the forearm. Looking at the forearm with the palm of the fingers facing up, the ulna is located on the inner (medial) aspect of the forearm. The radius is located on the outer (lateral) aspect of the forearm. Projecting from the end of the humerus are the medial and lateral epicondyles. The epicondyles are the boney attachment sites for many of the forearm muscles.

The muscles that move the fingers and the wrist originate at the elbow. These muscles attach via tendons to the medial and lateral epicondyles. Again, looking at the forearm with the palm of the fingers facing up, the forearm muscles that start on the medial epicondyle help to flex (move upwards, towards the face) the wrist and fingers. The forearm muscles that start on the lateral epicondyle help to extend (move downwards, away from the face) the wrist and fingers.

What is "Golfers elbow"?

"Golfers elbow" (a.k.a. medial epicondylitis) is the term used to describe irritation (inflammation) of the tendons that connect the muscles that flex the wrist and fingers to the medial epicondyle of the elbow. A common site for golfers elbow to occur is right at the attachment site of the tendons to the medial epicondyle. Although this site is the most common, inflammation can occur anywhere along the tendons.

What does golfers elbow feel like?

Golfers elbow usually begins with a gradual onset of dull, intermittent in the inner part of the elbow. It may progress and develop into a sharp continuous pain. Repetitive use of the elbow or arm can increase the pain. Tenderness is often present over the medial epicondyle of the elbow.

What causes golfers elbow?

Golfers elbow usually develops as a result of overuse. Repetitive use of the elbow and arm can cause undue stress on the tendons that flex the wrist and fingers. This in turn leads to the development of microscopic tears in the tendons that flex the wrist and fingers resulting in inflammation and pain. Training errors, weakness of the forearm muscles, poor equipment or inadequate off-season training are some of the other factors that can cause golfers elbow. Finally, golfers elbow can develop as a result of direct trauma or after an elbow injury such as a fracture.

Can golfers elbow be detected on X-rays?

Inflammation of the tendons that flex the wrist and fingers cannot be seen on x-ray. Therefore, although x-rays are often done to rule out bony injuries in individuals with golfers elbow these x-...

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Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)

What structures make up the elbow joint?

The elbow is made up of three bones, which are connected by muscles, ligaments and tendons. The humerus is the large upper arm bone. The ulna and radius are the two bones in the forearm. Looking at the forearm with the palm of the fingers facing up, the ulna is located on the inner (medial) aspect of the forearm. The radius is located on the outer (lateral) aspect of the forearm. Projecting from the end of the humerus are the medial and lateral epicondyles. The epicondyles are the boney attachment sites for many of the forearm muscles.

The muscles that move the fingers and the wrist start at the elbow. These muscles attach via tendons to the medial and lateral epicondyles. Again, looking at the forearm with the palm of the fingers facing up, the forearm muscles that start on the medial epicondyle help to flex (move upwards, towards the face) the wrist and fingers. The forearm muscles that start on the lateral epicondyle help to extend (move downwards, away from the face) the wrist and fingers.

What is "Tennis Elbow"?

"Tennis Elbow" (a.k.a. lateral epicondylitis) is the term used to describe irritation (inflammation) of the tendons that connect the muscles that extend the wrist and fingers to the lateral epicondyle of the elbow. A common site for tennis elbow to occur is right at the attachment site of the tendons to the lateral epicondyle. Although this site is the most common, inflammation can occur anywhere along the tendons.

What does tennis elbow feel like?

Tennis elbow usually begins with a gradual onset of dull, intermittent in the outer part of the elbow. It may progress and develop into a sharp continuous pain. Repetitive use of the elbow or arm can increase the pain. Tenderness is often present over the lateral epicondyle of the elbow.

What causes tennis elbow?

Tennis elbow usually develops as a result of overuse. Repetitive use of the elbow and arm can cause undue stress on the tendons that extend the wrist and fingers. This in turn leads to the development of microscopic tears in the tendons that extend the wrist and fingers resulting in inflammation and pain. Training errors, weakness of the forearm muscles, poor equipment or inadequate off-season training are some of the other factors that can cause tennis elbow. Finally, tennis elbow can develop as a result of direct trauma or after an elbow injury such as a fracture.

Can tennis elbow be detected on X-rays?

Inflammation of the tendons that extend the wrist and fingers cannot be seen on x-ray. Therefore, although x-rays are often done to rule out bony injuries in individuals with tennis elbow these x-rays a...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Joint Pain Info