Orthopedic Surgeons Shawnee KS

Local resource for orthopedic surgeons in Shawnee. Includes detailed information on local clinics that provide access to orthopedic surgery, as well as advice and content on how the muscular and skeletal systems interact, and how orthopedic injuries occur and affect your body.

Ronald Joseph Huerter, DDS
(913) 631-8941
12480 W 62nd Ter Ste 101
Shawnee, KS
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Chad Alan Waits, MD
Shawnee, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 2003

Data Provided By:
R Wayne Thompson, DDS
(913) 631-0110
11005 W 60th St Ste 180
Shawnee, KS
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Jeffrey Taylor Macmillan, MD
(913) 469-5272
12200 W 106th St
Overland Park, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pa Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19104
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided By:
John Anthony Romito, MD
(913) 541-8897
10550 Quivira Rd
Overland Park, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1973

Data Provided By:
Kyle Patrick Ritter, MD
Lenexa, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med, Indianapolis In 46202
Graduation Year: 2003

Data Provided By:
John A Romito
(913) 541-8897
12200 W 106th St
Overland Park, KS
Specialty
Foot & Ankle Surgery

Data Provided By:
Roger William Hood, MD
(913) 451-9310
12200 W 106th St Ste 400
Lenexa, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loyola Univ Of Chicago Stritch Sch Of Med, Maywood Il 60153
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Taylor L Markle, DDS
(913) 268-9500
11005 W 60th St
Shawnee, KS
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Mark Steven Humphrey, MD
(913) 541-8897
10600 Quivira Rd Ste 130
Overland Park, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided By:
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Olecrenon Bursitis

The elbow is made up of three bones, which are connected by muscles, ligaments and tendons. The humerus is the large upper arm bone. The ulna and radius are the two bones in the forearm. Looking at the forearm with the palm of the hand facing up, the ulna is located on the inner (medial) aspect of the forearm. The radius is located on the outer (lateral) aspect of the forearm. Projecting from the end of the humerus are the medial and lateral epicondyles. The epicondyles are the boney attachment sites for many of the forearm muscles.

A bursa (pl. bursae) is a small fluid filled sac that decreases the friction between two tissues. Bursae also protect bony structures. There are many different bursae around the elbow but the one that is most commonly injured is the olecrenon bursa.

The olecrenon bursa is usually very thin. When irritated or injured the olecrenon bursa can fill with fluid or blood and become large and painful. If repeatedly irritated or injured, the walls of the bursa may thicken and have irregular areas of scar tissue that are often mistaken as "bone chips". Calcium may also collect inside the bursa.

After a direct blow to the elbow the olecrenon bursa can become swollen. This can occur immediately or over a couple of hours. The degree of swelling can vary. The elbow is usually very painful to touch and it can also be painful to move. In addition, the area around the olecrenon bursa may be warm. If there is significant swelling X-rays are usually performed to rule out a broken or chipped bone.

Depending on the severity of the injury, the treatment of traumatic olecrenon bursitis may include resting the elbow, applying ice packs to the area, light compression of the elbow with a tensor bandage and elevation of the injured arm. Medications to help reduce the swelling and pain may also be required. If there is a large amount of swelling and the elbow is uncomfortable the bursa may need to be drained by a doctor.

After the swelling comes down and the bursa is less painful, padding the area may be required for some types of work, sports and recreational activities like gardening. In rare cases surgery is required to...

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Wrist Ganglion

What is a wrist ganglion?

"Ganglion" is the term used to describe a collection or "small sac" of fluid that can form around the wrist. Wrist ganglions are most often found on the back of the wrist, but they may also be found on the palm side of the wrist, or deep inside the wrist tissues.

What causes a wrist ganglion to form?

It is unclear what causes wrist ganglions to form, but they are often associated with repetitive use of the wrist, injury to the wrist or arthritis of the wrist. Ganglions may be small or large, and can increase or decrease in size. They are more common in women than in men and usually develop in adulthood.

Can a wrist ganglion be detected on X-ray?

A wrist ganglion cannot be seen on an x-ray. However, x-rays are often done to rule out arthritis or problems with the bones of the wrist that may be the underlying cause the wrist ganglion.

What does a wrist ganglion feel like?

A wrist ganglion may or may not be painful. Often people complain about the appearance more than the pain.

What other information is available on wrist ganglions?

The diagnosis and treatment of a ...

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