Hip Replacement Surgeons Sterling CO

Local resource for hip replacement surgeons in Sterling. Includes detailed information on local clinics that provide access to hip replacement surgery, as well as advice and content on how the hip joints work, how to ease the pain in your hip, and how to prevent hip injuries from occurring.

Floyd Homer Pohlman, MD
(970) 522-2264
1405 S 8th Ave # 1191
Sterling, CO
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ne Coll Of Med, Omaha Ne 68198
Graduation Year: 1971

Data Provided By:
Darrel Thomas Fenton
(970) 522-2264
1405 S 8th Ave
Sterling, CO
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Vincent Takwing Yu, MD
(970) 522-5711
1414 S 3rd Ave
Sterling, CO
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med, Indianapolis In 46202
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided By:
James H McKnight, MD FACS
(303) 522-5720
203 Country Club Dr
Sterling, CO
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Colorado
Graduation Year: 1953

Data Provided By:
Richard D Lazar, MD
(719) 471-2980
3010 N Circle Dr
Colorado Springs, CO
Business
Colorado Springs Orthopaedic Group
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Darrel Thomas Fenton, DO
(970) 522-2264
1405 S 8th Ave Ste 101
Sterling, CO
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Kirksville Coll Of Osteo Med, Kirksville Mo 63501
Graduation Year: 1980
Hospital
Hospital: St Anthony Hosp Central, Denver, Co; East Morgan County Hosp, Brush, Co; Melissa Mem Hosp, Holyoke, Co; Sedgwick County Mem Hosp, Julesburg, Co; Sterling Regional Medcenter, Sterling, Co; Memorial Health Center, Sidney, Ne
Group Practice: Nor

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Dr. Michael Johnson
Johnson Chiropractic P.C.
(970) 522-3260
501 West Main Street
Sterling, CO
Specialty
Chiropractor
Conditions
Back pain,Chronic pain,Foot pain,Leg pain,Lower back pain,Migraine headaches,Neck pain,Upper back pain
Treatments
Chiropractic adjustment,Chiropractic care,Spinal manipulation
Proffesional Affiliation
American Chiropractic Association,Colorado Chiropractic Association

Arjun Bhattacharya
(970) 466-0651
615 Fairhurst St
Sterling, CO
Specialty
General Surgery

Data Provided By:
N Curtis Kimball, MD
(970) 522-5720
1405 S 8th Ave
Sterling, CO
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1963
Hospital
Hospital: Haxtun Hosp Dist, Haxtun, Co; Melissa Mem Hosp, Holyoke, Co; Sterling Regional Medcenter, Sterling, Co
Group Practice: Northeast Colorado Surgical

Data Provided By:
James Ronald Trompeter, DDS
(720) 841-2262
19700 E Parker Square Drive PO Box 727
Parker, CO
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

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Anatomy of the Hip

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball is formed by the top of the thigh bone (the femur) and is called the "head" of the femur. The socket is formed by the bones of the pelvis and is called the acetabulum. Muscles, ligaments and tendons help hold the head of the femur in the acetabulum (the ball in the socket).

Articular cartilage is a smooth shiny material that covers the head of the femur and the acetabulum. Articular cartilage covers the bony surfaces wherever they come into contact with each other. Articular cartilage allows the head of the femur to move easily inside the acetabulum as the leg moves. Fluid also helps the head of the femur move easily inside the acetabulum. This fluid (called synovial fluid) provides nourishment and lubrication to the hip joint.

The hip joint is surrounded by a strong "bag" called a joint capsule. Ligaments are like strong ropes that help connect bones and provide stability to joints. Ligaments reinforce the capsule and connect the head of the femur to the acetabulum. These ligaments help prevent the head of the femur from coming out of the acetabulum. Larger, stronger ligaments also provide stability to the hip joint.

The acetabulum has a ring of tissue around it called the labrum. The labrum also helps provide stability to the hip.

Tendons connect muscles to bone. There are many muscles that surround the hip joint. These muscles and their tendons provide stability to the hip joint when the leg is moved. These muscles are also necessary for activities such as walking, running and jumping.

The hamstring muscles (at the back of the leg) act with the gluteus maximus (the "butt muscle") to move the leg backwards at the hip. The hip flexors (iliopsoas and rectus femoris) move the leg forward at the hip. The groin muscles (adductor magnus and longus) move leg toward th...

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Osteonecrosis of the Hip

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball is formed by the top of the thigh bone (the femur) and is called the "head" of the femur. The socket is formed by the bones of the pelvis and is called the acetabulum.

Articular cartilage is a smooth shiny material that covers the head of the femur and the acetabulum. Articular cartilage allows the head of the femur to move easily inside the acetabulum.

The term osteonecrosis is the term used to describe bone dying ("osteo" meaning bone and "necrosis" meaning dying). In osteonecrosis of the hip there is an interruption of the blood supply to the head of the femur. Without blood, the bone that forms the head of the femur and the articular cartilage that covers it can not get the nutrients that they need. The bone eventually dies. The head of the femur can lose its strength and collapse. The articular cartilage also breaks down.

What causes the blood supply to the head of the femur to be interrupted is not clear. It seems to occur more often in people aged 20 to 50 and in people with certain chronic (long term) medical conditions. Other risk factors for osteonecrosis of the hip include:

  • Alcoholism
  • Hip fracture or dislocation of the hip
  • The use of corticosteroid medications

The treatment of osteonecrosis of the hip depends on its s...

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