Hip Replacement Surgeons Marlboro NJ

Local resource for hip replacement surgeons in Marlboro. Includes detailed information on local clinics that provide access to hip replacement surgery, as well as advice and content on how the hip joints work, how to ease the pain in your hip, and how to prevent hip injuries from occurring.

Cohen Jason
(732) 530-4949
Route 9 S
Marlboro, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Barmakian Joseph
(732) 462-1700
222 Schanck Rd
Freehold, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Demetriades Lambro
(732) 462-1700
222 Schanck Rd
Freehold, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Decker Raymond
(732) 462-7700
535 Iron Bridge Rd
Freehold, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Berkowitz Steven
(732) 462-1700
222 Schanck Rd # 300
Freehold, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Chern Kenneth Yu-Dau
(732) 462-1700
222 Schanck Rd
Freehold, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Dennis Robert
(732) 462-1700
222 Schanck Road
Freehold, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Berkowitz Gregg
(732) 780-8811
4247 Us Highway 9 # 1
Freehold, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Cohen Michael
(732) 332-1299
200 Highway 34
Colts Neck, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Brandeisky John
(732) 308-1090
4249 Route 9 North
Freehold, NJ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
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Anatomy of the Hip

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball is formed by the top of the thigh bone (the femur) and is called the "head" of the femur. The socket is formed by the bones of the pelvis and is called the acetabulum. Muscles, ligaments and tendons help hold the head of the femur in the acetabulum (the ball in the socket).

Articular cartilage is a smooth shiny material that covers the head of the femur and the acetabulum. Articular cartilage covers the bony surfaces wherever they come into contact with each other. Articular cartilage allows the head of the femur to move easily inside the acetabulum as the leg moves. Fluid also helps the head of the femur move easily inside the acetabulum. This fluid (called synovial fluid) provides nourishment and lubrication to the hip joint.

The hip joint is surrounded by a strong "bag" called a joint capsule. Ligaments are like strong ropes that help connect bones and provide stability to joints. Ligaments reinforce the capsule and connect the head of the femur to the acetabulum. These ligaments help prevent the head of the femur from coming out of the acetabulum. Larger, stronger ligaments also provide stability to the hip joint.

The acetabulum has a ring of tissue around it called the labrum. The labrum also helps provide stability to the hip.

Tendons connect muscles to bone. There are many muscles that surround the hip joint. These muscles and their tendons provide stability to the hip joint when the leg is moved. These muscles are also necessary for activities such as walking, running and jumping.

The hamstring muscles (at the back of the leg) act with the gluteus maximus (the "butt muscle") to move the leg backwards at the hip. The hip flexors (iliopsoas and rectus femoris) move the leg forward at the hip. The groin muscles (adductor magnus and longus) move leg toward th...

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Osteonecrosis of the Hip

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball is formed by the top of the thigh bone (the femur) and is called the "head" of the femur. The socket is formed by the bones of the pelvis and is called the acetabulum.

Articular cartilage is a smooth shiny material that covers the head of the femur and the acetabulum. Articular cartilage allows the head of the femur to move easily inside the acetabulum.

The term osteonecrosis is the term used to describe bone dying ("osteo" meaning bone and "necrosis" meaning dying). In osteonecrosis of the hip there is an interruption of the blood supply to the head of the femur. Without blood, the bone that forms the head of the femur and the articular cartilage that covers it can not get the nutrients that they need. The bone eventually dies. The head of the femur can lose its strength and collapse. The articular cartilage also breaks down.

What causes the blood supply to the head of the femur to be interrupted is not clear. It seems to occur more often in people aged 20 to 50 and in people with certain chronic (long term) medical conditions. Other risk factors for osteonecrosis of the hip include:

  • Alcoholism
  • Hip fracture or dislocation of the hip
  • The use of corticosteroid medications

The treatment of osteonecrosis of the hip depends on its s...

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