Hip Replacement Surgeons Green Valley AZ

Local resource for hip replacement surgeons in Green Valley. Includes detailed information on local clinics that provide access to hip replacement surgery, as well as advice and content on how the hip joints work, how to ease the pain in your hip, and how to prevent hip injuries from occurring.

Michael F Hein, MD FACS
1312 N Boyce Ave
Green Valley, AZ
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: California(san Francisco)
Graduation Year: 1958

Data Provided By:
Edward I Boldon, MD FACS
3260 S Avenida Oconor
Green Valley, AZ
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wisconsin
Graduation Year: 1949

Data Provided By:
Eric Guy Ramsay, MD
(520) 324-5095
PO Box 42195
Tucson, AZ
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Glasgow Fac Of Med, Glasgow, Scotland (919-05 Eff 1/1971)
Graduation Year: 1950

Data Provided By:
United Community Health Center
(520) 407-5600
81 W Esperanza Blvd # 201
Green Valley, AZ

Data Provided By:
Nicholas A Ransom, MD
(520) 624-0888
1714 W Anklam Rd
Tucson, AZ
Business
PIMA Orthopedic Associates
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Otto Louis Loehden, MD
(503) 698-7653
2223 S Via Alonso
Green Valley, AZ
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Or Hlth Sci Univ Sch Of Med, Portland Or 97201
Graduation Year: 1958

Data Provided By:
John Bradford Kettelle, MD
1689 W Calle Carinosa
Sahuarita, AZ
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, Davis, Sch Of Med, Davis Ca 95616
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided By:
William Nathan Neubauer, MD
(520) 795-5845
PO Box 177
Tumacacori, AZ
Gender
Male
Languages
Spanish
Education
Medical School: Washington Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63110
Graduation Year: 1969
Hospital
Hospital: El Dorado Hosp, Tucson, Az; Tucson Med Ctr, Tucson, Az
Group Practice: Southwestern Surgery Assoc

Data Provided By:
Desert Eye Assoc Ltd
(520) 625-7450
1150 S Calle De Las Casitas
Green Valley, AZ

Data Provided By:
Duane D. H. Pitt, MD
(480) 656-4048
8573 E. Princess Drive,
Scottsdale, AZ
Business
Desert Institute for Spine Disorders, PC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Workmens Comp Accepted: Yes

Additional Information
Languages Spoken: English,Spanish

Data Provided By:
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Anatomy of the Hip

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball is formed by the top of the thigh bone (the femur) and is called the "head" of the femur. The socket is formed by the bones of the pelvis and is called the acetabulum. Muscles, ligaments and tendons help hold the head of the femur in the acetabulum (the ball in the socket).

Articular cartilage is a smooth shiny material that covers the head of the femur and the acetabulum. Articular cartilage covers the bony surfaces wherever they come into contact with each other. Articular cartilage allows the head of the femur to move easily inside the acetabulum as the leg moves. Fluid also helps the head of the femur move easily inside the acetabulum. This fluid (called synovial fluid) provides nourishment and lubrication to the hip joint.

The hip joint is surrounded by a strong "bag" called a joint capsule. Ligaments are like strong ropes that help connect bones and provide stability to joints. Ligaments reinforce the capsule and connect the head of the femur to the acetabulum. These ligaments help prevent the head of the femur from coming out of the acetabulum. Larger, stronger ligaments also provide stability to the hip joint.

The acetabulum has a ring of tissue around it called the labrum. The labrum also helps provide stability to the hip.

Tendons connect muscles to bone. There are many muscles that surround the hip joint. These muscles and their tendons provide stability to the hip joint when the leg is moved. These muscles are also necessary for activities such as walking, running and jumping.

The hamstring muscles (at the back of the leg) act with the gluteus maximus (the "butt muscle") to move the leg backwards at the hip. The hip flexors (iliopsoas and rectus femoris) move the leg forward at the hip. The groin muscles (adductor magnus and longus) move leg toward th...

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Osteonecrosis of the Hip

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball is formed by the top of the thigh bone (the femur) and is called the "head" of the femur. The socket is formed by the bones of the pelvis and is called the acetabulum.

Articular cartilage is a smooth shiny material that covers the head of the femur and the acetabulum. Articular cartilage allows the head of the femur to move easily inside the acetabulum.

The term osteonecrosis is the term used to describe bone dying ("osteo" meaning bone and "necrosis" meaning dying). In osteonecrosis of the hip there is an interruption of the blood supply to the head of the femur. Without blood, the bone that forms the head of the femur and the articular cartilage that covers it can not get the nutrients that they need. The bone eventually dies. The head of the femur can lose its strength and collapse. The articular cartilage also breaks down.

What causes the blood supply to the head of the femur to be interrupted is not clear. It seems to occur more often in people aged 20 to 50 and in people with certain chronic (long term) medical conditions. Other risk factors for osteonecrosis of the hip include:

  • Alcoholism
  • Hip fracture or dislocation of the hip
  • The use of corticosteroid medications

The treatment of osteonecrosis of the hip depends on its s...

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