Hip Replacement Surgeons Eufaula AL

Local resource for hip replacement surgeons in Eufaula. Includes detailed information on local clinics that provide access to hip replacement surgery, as well as advice and content on how the hip joints work, how to ease the pain in your hip, and how to prevent hip injuries from occurring.

Elizabeth Buss Robinson, MD
(334) 687-2887
825 W Washington St
Eufaula, AL
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Emory Univ Sch Of Med, Atlanta Ga 30322
Graduation Year: 1983
Hospital
Hospital: Lakeview Community Hosp, Eufaula, Al
Group Practice: Robinson Surgical Ctr

Data Provided By:
Howard P Katz, DO
(330) 434-1072
825 W Washington St
Eufaula, AL
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Des Moines Univ, Coll Osteo Med & Surg, Des Moines Ia 50312
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided By:
Andrew J Carter, DDS
(334) 792-5124
206 Executive Park Dr
Dothan, AL
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Jay Richard Solorio
(256) 353-8811
2828 Highway 31 S
Decatur, AL
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Daryl Glenn Dykes, MD
(205) 621-3778
1022 1st St N Ste 220
Alabaster, AL
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of South Fl Coll Of Med, Tampa Fl 33612
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided By:
Ronald Roy Lawrence, MD FACS
825 W Washington St
Eufaula, AL
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Temple
Graduation Year: 1966

Data Provided By:
John Munford Jackson, MD
(334) 687-5775
PO Box 554
Eufaula, AL
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Al Sch Of Med, Birmingham Al 35294
Graduation Year: 1958

Data Provided By:
Randall Joseph Tindell, MD
(256) 881-5151
4715 Whitesburg Dr S
Huntsville, AL
Specialties
Orthopedics, General Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tn, Memphis, Coll Of Med, Memphis Tn 38163
Graduation Year: 1981
Hospital
Hospital: Crestwood Med Ctr, Huntsville, Al; Huntsville Hosp-West, Huntsville, Al
Group Practice: Alabama Clinic-Orthopedic Surg

Data Provided By:
Thomas M Barbour, MD
(251) 476-5050
PO Box 86144
Mobile, AL
Specialties
Orthopedics, Hand Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Al Sch Of Med, Birmingham Al 35294
Graduation Year: 1988

Data Provided By:
Frederick Nelson Meyer, MD
(251) 607-7100
6505 Sugar Pointe Ct
Mobile, AL
Specialties
Orthopedics, Hand Surgery
Gender
Male
Languages
German, Spanish, Russian
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ia Coll Of Med, Iowa City Ia 52242
Graduation Year: 1971
Hospital
Hospital: University Of South Alabama Me, Mobile, Al
Group Practice: Univ Of So Alabama Pediatrics & Adloescent Medicine; University Of South Alabama Health Services Foundation

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Anatomy of the Hip

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball is formed by the top of the thigh bone (the femur) and is called the "head" of the femur. The socket is formed by the bones of the pelvis and is called the acetabulum. Muscles, ligaments and tendons help hold the head of the femur in the acetabulum (the ball in the socket).

Articular cartilage is a smooth shiny material that covers the head of the femur and the acetabulum. Articular cartilage covers the bony surfaces wherever they come into contact with each other. Articular cartilage allows the head of the femur to move easily inside the acetabulum as the leg moves. Fluid also helps the head of the femur move easily inside the acetabulum. This fluid (called synovial fluid) provides nourishment and lubrication to the hip joint.

The hip joint is surrounded by a strong "bag" called a joint capsule. Ligaments are like strong ropes that help connect bones and provide stability to joints. Ligaments reinforce the capsule and connect the head of the femur to the acetabulum. These ligaments help prevent the head of the femur from coming out of the acetabulum. Larger, stronger ligaments also provide stability to the hip joint.

The acetabulum has a ring of tissue around it called the labrum. The labrum also helps provide stability to the hip.

Tendons connect muscles to bone. There are many muscles that surround the hip joint. These muscles and their tendons provide stability to the hip joint when the leg is moved. These muscles are also necessary for activities such as walking, running and jumping.

The hamstring muscles (at the back of the leg) act with the gluteus maximus (the "butt muscle") to move the leg backwards at the hip. The hip flexors (iliopsoas and rectus femoris) move the leg forward at the hip. The groin muscles (adductor magnus and longus) move leg toward th...

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Osteonecrosis of the Hip

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball is formed by the top of the thigh bone (the femur) and is called the "head" of the femur. The socket is formed by the bones of the pelvis and is called the acetabulum.

Articular cartilage is a smooth shiny material that covers the head of the femur and the acetabulum. Articular cartilage allows the head of the femur to move easily inside the acetabulum.

The term osteonecrosis is the term used to describe bone dying ("osteo" meaning bone and "necrosis" meaning dying). In osteonecrosis of the hip there is an interruption of the blood supply to the head of the femur. Without blood, the bone that forms the head of the femur and the articular cartilage that covers it can not get the nutrients that they need. The bone eventually dies. The head of the femur can lose its strength and collapse. The articular cartilage also breaks down.

What causes the blood supply to the head of the femur to be interrupted is not clear. It seems to occur more often in people aged 20 to 50 and in people with certain chronic (long term) medical conditions. Other risk factors for osteonecrosis of the hip include:

  • Alcoholism
  • Hip fracture or dislocation of the hip
  • The use of corticosteroid medications

The treatment of osteonecrosis of the hip depends on its s...

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