Hip Replacement Surgeons Carson City NV

Local resource for hip replacement surgeons in Carson City. Includes detailed information on local clinics that provide access to hip replacement surgery, as well as advice and content on how the hip joints work, how to ease the pain in your hip, and how to prevent hip injuries from occurring.

Allen Myron Schnaser, MD
(775) 882-4427
1001 Mountain St
Carson City, NV
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis, Minneapolis Mn 55455
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided By:
Kent Willis Gabriel, MD
(775) 885-8890
1001 Mountain St Ste 3M
Carson City, NV
Specialties
Orthopedics, Hand Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, Los Angeles, Ucla Sch Of Med, Los Angeles Ca 90024
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided By:
Dr.Richard Long
(775) 883-1544
1000 N Division St # 100
Carson City, NV
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, San Francisco, Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1964
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Hospital: Ioannis A Lougaris Va Med Ctr, Reno, Nv
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Kent W Gabriel
(775) 885-8890
1001 Mountain St
Carson City, NV
Specialty
Hand Surgery

Data Provided By:
Roger Paul Rogalski
(775) 841-9991
2874 N Carson St
Carson City, NV
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery, Sports Medicine

Data Provided By:
Richard D Long
(775) 883-1544
1000 N Division St
Carson City, NV
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Richard Dean Long, MD
(775) 883-1544
1000 N Division St Ste 100
Carson City, NV
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ca, San Francisco, Sch Of Med, San Francisco Ca 94143
Graduation Year: 1964
Hospital
Hospital: Ioannis A Lougaris Va Med Ctr, Reno, Nv; Carson Tahoe Hosp, Carson City, Nv
Group Practice: Spinal Institute Of Nevada

Data Provided By:
Martin Richard Anderson, MD
(775) 884-5470
1104 N Division St
Carson City, NV
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Co Sch Of Med, Denver Co 80262
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided By:
John Allan Coombs, DDS
(775) 882-5911
525 W Washington St
Carson City, NV
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Joseph Patrick Walls
(775) 888-9197
755 N Roop St
Carson City, NV
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
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Anatomy of the Hip

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball is formed by the top of the thigh bone (the femur) and is called the "head" of the femur. The socket is formed by the bones of the pelvis and is called the acetabulum. Muscles, ligaments and tendons help hold the head of the femur in the acetabulum (the ball in the socket).

Articular cartilage is a smooth shiny material that covers the head of the femur and the acetabulum. Articular cartilage covers the bony surfaces wherever they come into contact with each other. Articular cartilage allows the head of the femur to move easily inside the acetabulum as the leg moves. Fluid also helps the head of the femur move easily inside the acetabulum. This fluid (called synovial fluid) provides nourishment and lubrication to the hip joint.

The hip joint is surrounded by a strong "bag" called a joint capsule. Ligaments are like strong ropes that help connect bones and provide stability to joints. Ligaments reinforce the capsule and connect the head of the femur to the acetabulum. These ligaments help prevent the head of the femur from coming out of the acetabulum. Larger, stronger ligaments also provide stability to the hip joint.

The acetabulum has a ring of tissue around it called the labrum. The labrum also helps provide stability to the hip.

Tendons connect muscles to bone. There are many muscles that surround the hip joint. These muscles and their tendons provide stability to the hip joint when the leg is moved. These muscles are also necessary for activities such as walking, running and jumping.

The hamstring muscles (at the back of the leg) act with the gluteus maximus (the "butt muscle") to move the leg backwards at the hip. The hip flexors (iliopsoas and rectus femoris) move the leg forward at the hip. The groin muscles (adductor magnus and longus) move leg toward th...

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Osteonecrosis of the Hip

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball is formed by the top of the thigh bone (the femur) and is called the "head" of the femur. The socket is formed by the bones of the pelvis and is called the acetabulum.

Articular cartilage is a smooth shiny material that covers the head of the femur and the acetabulum. Articular cartilage allows the head of the femur to move easily inside the acetabulum.

The term osteonecrosis is the term used to describe bone dying ("osteo" meaning bone and "necrosis" meaning dying). In osteonecrosis of the hip there is an interruption of the blood supply to the head of the femur. Without blood, the bone that forms the head of the femur and the articular cartilage that covers it can not get the nutrients that they need. The bone eventually dies. The head of the femur can lose its strength and collapse. The articular cartilage also breaks down.

What causes the blood supply to the head of the femur to be interrupted is not clear. It seems to occur more often in people aged 20 to 50 and in people with certain chronic (long term) medical conditions. Other risk factors for osteonecrosis of the hip include:

  • Alcoholism
  • Hip fracture or dislocation of the hip
  • The use of corticosteroid medications

The treatment of osteonecrosis of the hip depends on its s...

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