Elbow Injury Specialists Bay Minette AL

Local resource for elbow injury specialists in Bay Minette. Includes detailed information on local clinics that provide access to elbow injury specialists, as well as advice and content on how the elbow joint works, how to ease the pain in your elbow, and how to prevent elbow injuries from occurring.

Leslie V Rush
(251) 625-2663
1505 Daphne Ave
Daphne, AL
Specialty
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Data Provided By:
Progressive Rehab Svc Inc
(251) 621-6865
1207 Main St
Daphne, AL

Data Provided By:
Diana Kirk Hashimi
(251) 445-1850
6475 Spanish Fort Blvd
Spanish Fort, AL
Specialty
Internal Medicine

Data Provided By:
Benjamin Powell Schrubbe
(251) 621-6520
27961 Us Highway 98
Daphne, AL
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided By:
Henry Horton Davis
(251) 626-1175
27961 Highway 98
Daphne, AL
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided By:
Robin Elo Murray, MD
(251) 626-2273
28490 2nd St
Daphne, AL
Specialties
Family Practice, Sports Medicine-Family Practice, Physical Medicine And Rehabilitation
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of South Al Coll Of Med, Mobile Al 36688
Graduation Year: 1977
Hospital
Hospital: Springhill Memorial Hosp, Mobile, Al; Providence Hosp, Mobile, Al
Group Practice: American Wellness Assoc Inc

Data Provided By:
Jack Thompson MD PA
(251) 675-3594
1084 Industrial Pkwy
Saraland, AL
Specialties
Pediatrics

Data Provided By:
Samuel Perry Marshall, MD
(334) 479-3275
500 Spanish Fort Blvd Apt 344
Spanish Fort, AL
Specialties
General Practice
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Va Sch Of Med, Charlottesville Va 22908
Graduation Year: 1943

Data Provided By:
Louis Alojz Berec
(251) 964-4011
1083 E Relham Dr
Loxley, AL
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided By:
Robert Atkinson McKnight
(251) 625-8211
7101 Us Highway 90 Ste 202
Daphne, AL
Specialty
Family Practice

Data Provided By:
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Elbow Anatomy

The elbow is made up of three bones, which are connected by muscles, ligaments and tendons. The humerus is the large upper arm bone. The ulna and radius are the two bones in the forearm. Looking at the forearm with the palm of the hand facing up, the ulna is located on the inner (medial) aspect of the forearm. The radius is located on the outer (lateral) aspect of the forearm. Projecting from the end of the humerus are the medial and lateral epicondyles. The epicondyles are the boney attachment sites for many of the forearm muscles.

The elbow joint is actually three separate joints; the ulnohumeral joint, the radiohumeral joint and the superior radioulnar joint. These three joints are enclosed by a loose "bag" called the joint capsule. Movement between the ulna and the humerus occurs at the ulnohumeral joint. Movement between the radius and the humerus occurs at the radiohumeral joint and movement between the radius and the ulna occurs at the superior radioulnar joint.

Ligaments are like strong ropes that connect bones and provide stability to joints. In the elbow there are four main ligaments. On medial aspect of the elbow is the ulnar collateral ligament that connects the ulna to the humerus. On lateral aspect of the elbow is the radial collateral ligament that connects the radius to the humerus. The other two ligaments are the annular ligament and the quadrate ligament. They connect the radius to the ulna.

Articular cartilage is a smooth shiny material that covers the ends of the bones in the elbow. There is articular cartilage anywhere that two bony surfaces come into contact with each other. In the elbow, articular cartilage covers the ends of the humerus, radius and ulna. Articular cartilage allows the elbow bones to move easily as the elbow bends (flexes), straightens (extends), rotates the palm up (supinates), and rotates the palm down (pronates).

The strong biceps, brachialis and brachioradialis muscles flex the elbow. The triceps muscle extends the elbow. Other muscles that move the hand at the wrist originate at the elbow. These muscles attach via tendons to the medial and lateral epicondyles. The forearm muscles that originate on the medial epicondyle help to flex the wrist and hand. The forearm mu...

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Elbow Biomechanics

The elbow joint is actually three separate joints; the ulnohumeral joint, the radiohumeral joint and the superior radioulnar joint. All three joints are enclosed by a single joint capsule. Movement between the ulna and the humerus occurs at the ulnohumeral joint. Movement between the radius and the humerus occurs at the radiohumeral joint and movement between the radius and the ulna occurs at the superior radioulnar joint.

The ulnohumeral and radiohumeral joints are modified hinge joints. The biceps, brachialis, and brachioradialis muscles bend (flex) these two joints. The triceps muscles on the back of the arm straighten (extend) these two joints. Normal elbow flexion varies between 135 degrees to 155 degrees. The superior radioulnar joint is a pivot joint. This joint allows supination and pronation of the forearm and wrist to occur. Supination is rotation of the forearm so that the palm is turned up. Pronation is rotation of the forearm so that the palm is turned down. The biceps and supinator muscles supinate the elbow. The pronator quadratus, pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis muscles pronate the elbow.

When the elbow is fully extended and supinated, the forearm is angled slightly away from the long axis of the humerus. This angle is called the "carrying angle". In men this angle ranges between 10 to 15 degrees and in women this angle ranges between 15 to 20 degrees. Muscle weakness or ligament injury can lead to abnormal biomechanics of the elbow that can result in abnormal forces in the elbow. Over time these abnormal forces can cause the articular cartilage of the elbow to w...

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